9 tips for improving in marathon and half marathon

street marathon

1. DO I HAVE TO BE ABLE TO RUN AT A CERTAIN PACE BEFORE PARTICIPATING IN MY FIRST MARATHON?

For your first marathon, the important thing is not rhythm, but distance (42 km!). You must put quantity (more distance) before quality (higher intensity of training). Preparing for a marathon is different from the usual training, due to longer distances and lower intensity. This means you have to do more long throwing at a smooth pace and less training at a tempo pace. If you want to finish in less than 4 hours, you must run 50-60 km per week.

2. HOW MUCH TIME SHOULD I DEDICATE TO MEDIA AND MARATHON TRAINING?

There is an old rule that says, “If you train too much, you won’t win the prize”. Avoid unnecessary kilometres. Every extra mile carries a risk of injury. The training is demanding enough without the need to add training without a clear objective. Rest days cannot be missed in your training program. Beginners over long distances can have a lot of fun running 3-4 days a week. On three of these training days you should not run for more than an hour (if you’re running a marathon) or 45 minutes (focus on half an hour), and your long die roll can be up to 1:45 or 2:00 (for marathon) and 1:15 or 1:30 (for half a marathon).

3. CAN I RUN TWO MARATHONS A YEAR?

Most experts, including us, believe that you can run a maximum of two marathons per year. Each marathon should include not only 3-6 months of preparation, but also a 6-8 week recovery period. Therefore, between 5 and 8 months of the year are required for each marathon if you want to do a proper training. The intensity of the race must also be taken into account. Even the usual marathon runners agree that elite runners must follow a precise training programme and can only compete in 2 or 3 marathons at the highest level. Recovery needs are often underestimated. In short, if you want to run two marathons a year, schedule one in spring and one in autumn. That way you’ll have plenty of time for preparation and recovery, and you’ll be able to cross the finish line in every race without any problems, and with the certainty that you’ll be able to do another two the following year.

4. HOW MANY KILOMETERS SHOULD I HAVE RUN WITH THE SLIPPERS I WILL WEAR IN THE MARATHON?

There is a specific rule for the sneakers that you will wear in the marathon: you should have run with them at least the same distance as the race, that is, 42. You don’t have to start running the marathon with a pair of sneakers, but you don’t have to wear one that’s too old either. Try yours at a marathon pace and on the same surface where you are going to race.

5. HOW FAST SHOULD I RUN MY LONG DIE ROLL?

The goal of your long spin is to train your fat metabolism, which activates at slower speeds. This may sound paradoxical, but a slow pace lays the foundation for running a fast marathon. The ideal pace (per kilometer) for endurance training is 60 seconds per kilometer slower than your marathon pace. If you run the marathon in 6 minutes per kilometre, you should go 7 minutes per kilometre on your long run.

6. WHAT SHOULD I DO ON DAYS I DON’ T FEEL LIKE RUNNING?

Do you feel tired and tense? Start your workout with a gentle jog for 15 minutes. If you’re still not relaxed, take a walk or skip practice. Often this tension is due to some other problem besides the lack of motivation. Don’t confuse it with laziness first thing in the morning or after a day’s work. Possible causes include an underlying disease (may be a hidden infection), nutritional sciences (e. g., iron), occupational or domestic stress, or overtraining. Listen to your body, consult a doctor or ask your training partners for help when you lose motivation.

7. HOW DO I PREVENT CRAMPS FROM APPEARING?

The best way to prevent them is to drink enough fluids and carbohydrates during the race, especially at first. Talking to trainers of long-distance runners, what they usually recommend is to drink about 200 milliliters of liquids every 5 kilometers. It is also important that during training you take in sufficient amounts of electrolytes (sodium, potassium and magnesium), minerals and trace elements. Waldemar Cierpinski, two-time Olympic marathon champion, also recommends nutritional supplements. According to this runner, who has been the best German marathon runner of all time,”adding minerals in the last 6-8 weeks before the marathon is recommended, in addition to taking vitamin E supplements in the last week.

8. HOW DO I DEAL WITH THE LAST TWO WEEKS BEFORE MY FIRST HALF-MARATHON?

The ideal would be to run a 15 or 16 km race a couple of weeks before the half-marathon. We have to get to the starting line of the half-marathon fairly rested, with the desire to run, without a trace of fatigue or aches and pains in the legs. With the shoes used but not too worn. With the timetable of our body accustomed to the schedule of the race, especially if we have to travel to run. And don’t forget that the first half marathon is a goal in itself, don’t use it as a springboard to jump immediately to the marathon.

9. HOW DO ICE BATHS WORK?

Women’s marathon world record holder Paula Radcliffe has every confidence in them, as does New York marathon winner Meb Ke? ezighi. Ice baths are a method of recovery after long-distance running. A hot bath is more comfortable, but a cold bath helps to stop the pain caused by small microtraumatic muscle lesions. Many cyclists from the Tour de France are submerged in ice tubs up to the hips for a few minutes. You don’t need to freeze. Just hold on until you notice a decrease in pain.

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